Launching the Privacy and Sustainable Computing Lab @ WU Vienna

Vienna University of Economics and Business
September 29th-30th, 2016, Vienna, Austria

When it comes to developing sustainable computing systems, private, secure, open and ethical IT is the way of the future. The General Data Protection Legislation passed in January 2016 has been a landmark in this endeavor, however beyond legislation the time is ripe for societal and technological changes.

On the occasion of the inaugural event of the WU’s Privacy & Sustainable Computing Lab, we analyse where we stand in terms of privacy for sustainable computing. This event brings together current perspectives from NGO's, standardisation bodies, researchers, engineers, business and legal representatives.

 

THU 29.09.2016  17:30 - 17:40 

Welcome Speech by Vice-Rector of Research, WU

Room: TC.0.01

 

THU 29.09.2016  17:40 - 20:20  The Ethical Perspective

"Ethics & Value Based Design – Can we Create a Better Future?"

Room: TC.0.01

<strong>Aral Balkan</strong> <p> Activist</p> <font color="#e5e5e5">This is some text! This is some text! This is some text!This is some text!This is some text!</font>
Aral Balkan is an activist and designer with over 30 years of coding experience. He’s one-third of Ind.ie, a tiny two-person-and-one-husky social enterprise working for social justice in the digital age; an enterprise that has made itself a name both through ethical technology development, such as latest app, as well as the Ethical Design Manifesto.
<i>Beyond The Clouds</i><font color="#e5e5e5"> This is some text! This is some text! This is some text! This is some text! This is some text! This is some text! This is some text </font>

The open web is dead.

From its smouldering ashes protrude the cold, silicon panopticons of surveillance capitalism; the feudal dominions of platform monopolies like Google, Facebook, Yahoo, Uber… All engaged in the same despicable business of farming human beings.

This is the dystopia of our present.

But there is hope for a better future. How we get there is what this talk is about.

<strong>Univ. Prof. Dr. Sarah Spiekermann</strong><p>Author of “Ethical IT Innovation” & Head of the Institute for MIS @ WU</p><font color="#e5e5e5">This is some text!This is some text!This is some text!</font>

Univ.Prof. Dr. Sarah Spiekermann is a professor for Business Informatics since 2009 and chairs the IMIS. Her main areas of expertise are electronic privacy, RFID, personalisation/CRM, attention and interruption management (notification platforms) and context-adaptivity. She has been advising the EU Commission in the area of privacy for RFID since 2005, served as a reviewer of RFID FP7 projects SMART and BRIDGE, co-authored and negotiated the PIA-Framework for RFID (signed in April 2011 by the EU Commission) and developed the PIA guidelines for privacy-friendly RFID systems for the German Federal Institute of Information Security (BSI) (published in November 2011).

 

<i>Ethical System Development</i><font color="#e5e5e5"> This is some text! This is some text! This is some some text! This is some text! This is some text!</font>

Technology is fundamentally changing our private and professional lives. And this change bears both potentials and challenges for our societies. In order to ensure that our future is one in which we all desire to live, I propose that we should develop our IT systems in a more ethical way. In my new book on Ethical IT Innovation: A Value-Based System Design Approach I build on multiple disciplines to discuss how this could work: computer science, philosophy, psychology and management theory have all contributed valuable insights into how to move forward. My talk explores the latest thinking on computer ethics, including the normative ethical theories currently shaping the debate over the good and bad consequences of technology. I begin by making the case as to why IT professionals, managers, and engineers must consider the ethical issues when designing IT systems. I then present an innovative system development approach that I call the „E-SDLC“ or Ethical System Development Life Cycle.

<strong>John Havens</strong><p>Author of “Heartifical Intelligence” & Executive Director of The Global Initiative for Ethical Considerations in the Design of Autonomous Systems</p>

John C. Havens is Executive Director of The Global Initiative for EthicalConsiderations in the Design of Autonomous Systems, an Industry Connections Program of the IEEE Standards Association. The Initiative is creating a Charter Code of Conduct and standards recommendations guided by over one hundred thought leaders with a mission of ensuring every technologist is educated, trained, and empowered to prioritize ethical considerations in the design and development of autonomous and intelligent systems.

John is also a regular contributor on issues of technology and wellbeing to Mashable, The Guardian, HuffPo and TechCrunch and is author of "Heartificial Intelligence: Embracing Our Humanity To Maximize Machines" and Hacking Happiness: Why Your Personal Data Counts and How Tracking it Can Change the World. John was an EVP of a Top Ten PR Firm, a VP of a tech startup, and an independent consultant where he has worked with clients such as Gillette, P&G, HP, Wal-Mart, Ford, Allstate, Monster, Gallo Wines, and Merck.  He was also the Founder of The Happathon Project, a non-profit utilising emerging technology and positive psychology to increase human wellbeing.

John has spoken at TEDx, at SXSW Interactive (six times), and as a global keynote speaker for clients like Cisco, Gillette, IEEE, and NXP Semiconductors.  John was also a professional actor on Broadway, TV and Film for fifteen years.

For more information, visit John’s site or follow him @johnchavens.

<i>Individual-in-the-Loop</i><font color="#e5e5e5"> This is some text! This is some text! This is some some text! This is some text! This is some text!</font>

The Global Initiative for EthicalConsiderations in the Design of Autonomous Systems is an Industry Connections Program of the IEEE Standards Association.  It was formed with two primary deliverables: create a document featuring key issues in Artificial Intelligence and Autonomous Systems (AI/AS) grounded in ethically-aligned design; and, make Standard Project recommendations to IEEE-SA based on these issues. 

Created as an inclusive, consensus-building program, the mission of the Global Initiative is to ensure every technologist is educated, trained, and empowered to prioritize ethical considerations in the design and development of autonomous and intelligent systems. The Initiative currently has over one hundred global experts in AI and ethics and recently held their first face-to-face meeting in The Hague. 

The document The Initiative is creating will be released in early December, 2016 under a Creative Commons license for any organization to adopt to help prioritize ethically-aligned design in AI/AS.  It will also be directly submitted to IEEE for formal consideration, re: policy decisions by their official channels handling these issues.

The Global Initiative was also the primary catalyst for IEEE P7000TM, a Standards Project entitled, Model Process for Addressing Ethical Concerns During System Design.  The Working Group for this Standards Project launched in September of 2016 and is on track to become a Standard within the next two to three years.

<strong>Moderator: Prof. Udo Helmbrecht </strong> <p>Director of the EU Agency for Network and Information Security, ENISA</p><br /><p>"How realistic are ethical machines in time of globalisation?"</p><i> <p>Prof. Udo Helmbrecht will challenge the vision of the speakers. He will present currently ongoing debates about security concerns, which challenge ethical principles of IT system design and implementation.</p></i>

Prof. Dr. Udo Helmbrecht has more than 35 years of professional management experience in the IT sector. Udo Helmbrecht was born in 1955, in Castrop-Rauxel, North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany. He studied Physics, Mathematics and Computer Science at Ruhr-University, Bochum, and in 1984 he was awarded a PhD in Theoretical Physics. In 2010 Udo Helmbrecht was appointed honorary professor at the Universität der Bundeswehr Munich, Germany.

His experience in the field of security has been acquired through work in a variety of areas, including the energy industry, insurance, engineering, aviation, defence, and the space industry. He became the president of the German Federal Office for Information Security (BSI) in 2003.

Udo Helmbrecht took office as Executive Director of the European Union Agency for Network and Information Security (ENISA) in October 2009.

For more information: http://www.enisa.europa.eu/about-enisa

To contact Dr. Helmbrecht: press@enisa.europa.eu

 

 

FRI 30.09.2016  8:30-9:00  Introducing the Lab

"Future Privacy & Data Protection in a Global Big Data World"

Room: LC.0.200

<strong>Sarah Spiekermann </strong> <p>Professor for Business Informatics and chair of the Institute for Management Information Systems</p>

Univ.Prof. Dr. Sarah Spiekermann is a professor for Business Informatics since 2009 and chairs the IMIS. Her main areas of expertise are electronic privacy, RFID, personalisation/CRM, attention and interruption management (notification platforms) and context-adaptivity. She has been advising the EU Commission in the area of privacy for RFID since 2005, served as a reviewer of RFID FP7 projects SMART and BRIDGE, co-authored and negotiated the PIA-Framework for RFID (signed in April 2011 by the EU Commission) and developed the PIA guidelines for privacy-friendly RFID systems for the German Federal Institute of Information Security (BSI) (published in November 2011).

<strong>Axel Polleres</strong> <p>Professor for Business Informatics and chair of the Institute for Business Information Systems</p>

Univ.-Prof. Dr. Axel Polleres joined the WU in September 2013. Before he worked at TU Vienna, Univ. Innsbruck, Univ. Rey Juan Carlos (Madrid, Spain), the Digital Enterprise Research Institute (DERI) at NUI Galway (Ireland), and for Siemens AG. His research focuses on ontologies, query and rules languages, Semantic Web technologies (particularly scalable semantic data management), Web services, knowledge management, Linked Open Data, configuration technologies and their applications. Axel has published more than 100 scientific articles and actively contributed to international standardisation efforts within the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) where he co-chaired the W3C SPARQL working group.

<strong>Sabrina Kirrane </strong> <p>Assistant professor and director of the Privacy for Sustainable Computing Lab @ WU</p>

Dr. Sabrina Kirrane joined the WU as a postdoctoral researcher in September 2015. Prior to taking up the position at WU she was a researcher at the Insight Centre for Data Analytics, Ireland. Her PhD focused on the problem of access control for the Web of Data. Before that she spent several years working in Industry on topics around data integration and security, such as system security requirements their and implementation in an application service provider environment. Sabrina’s research focuses on the privacy issues that can result from interlinked machine-readable data. Dr. Kirrane is a guest editor for the Journal of Web Semantics special issue on Security, Privacy and Policy for the Semantic Web and Linked Data and besides others organiser of the PrivOn workshop series on Society, Privacy and the Semantic Web - Policy and Technology.

 

FRI 30.09.2016  9:00-11:00  NGOs Perspective

"Keynote(s)- Where do we stand in Terms of Privacy?"

 Room: LC.0.200

<strong>Wolfie Christl</strong><p>Activist, Researcher, Writer and Educator</p> <font color="#e5e5e5">is some text! </font>

Wolfie Christl is a privacy advocate, researcher, writer and educator with a focus on the societal implications of ICT. He is the co-founder of Cracked Labs – Institute for Critical Digital Culture, based in Vienna, Austria. Having been a web developer for many years, his work is now focused on consumer privacy in times of Big Data, digital tracking, personal data ecosystems and algorithmic decision-making.

His 2014 study on corporate surveillance was widely discussed in German-speaking countries, and it was presented in the European Parliament. Before, he co-created Data Dealer, an educational game about privacy, which won numerous prizes, including the e-virtuoses Serious Games Award (France) and the Games for Change Award (US).

In 2015, he contributed to donottrack, an award-winning web documentary series about digital tracking. Additionally, he works as a trainer for cyber security, writes for newspapers such as the German FAZ, and he has been quoted in the New York Times, Forbes, The New Yorker and many other media outlets. He has given a wide range of guest lectures and talks, including at the universities of Vienna and Graz, TEDxVienna, re:publica, at Austrian and German federal ministries, and in the Czech Republic, Poland, Italia, Belgium, Netherlands, and the US.

http://wolfie.crackedlabs.org

<i>Where does privacy stand today? A Report on the Ethics of Personal Data Markets </i>

Today thousands of companies are tracking and analysing our everyday behaviour – cross-browser, cross-platform and cross-device. They are using this data to personalise services, to make predictions, to rank and rate individuals, and to motivate behavioural change. The Vienna-based researcher Wolfie Christl spent several years investigating issues of digital tracking, personal data markets and consumer privacy. He will present his most recent report on global trends of corporate surveillance and its social, cultural and ethical implications.

To what extent do companies today really gather, process and exploit personal data? How do data brokers and ad tech businesses combine, link and match online and “offline” data? Which platforms and devices are relevant, and will the upcoming Internet of Things lead to ubiquitous surveillance? What can be predicted from purchases, phone calls, visited websites and likes? How is predictive analytics and algorithmic decision-making already being used in retail, banking, insurance, health, human resources and education?  To what extent do marketing analytics, scoring, fraud detection and risk management more and more join forces? And, what are the societal implications and risks of ubiquitous corporate surveillance?

<strong>Andreas Krisch</strong><p>President of the NGO EDRI, European Digital Rights</p>

Andreas Krisch is President of European Digital Rights (EDRi), of the Austrian Association for Internet Users (VIBE!AT) and the Austrian Forum Data Protection. In his professional capacity he is managing partner of mksult GmbH, an Austrian data protection consultancy.

Andreas regularly contributes to the European discussion on a data protection compliant adoption of Information Technology. He repeatedly provided his expertise on data protection, RFID and the Internet of Things to institutions such as the European Commission, the European Parliament, the Council of Europe and the OECD. With his colleagues at AKVorrat he initiated the constitutional complaint against mandatory data retention in Austria, which was filed by 11.139 plaintifs and lead to the rulings of the ECJ and the Austrian Constitutional Court, which declared the data retention directive invalid and the Austrian transposition unconstitutional.

Andreas Krisch is member of the Datenschutzrat, an advisory body to the Austrian Government.

<i>The new General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR)... and now?</i><font color="#e5e5e5">This is some text! </font>

After the GDPR has been adopted, national governments and companies alike face a lot of topics that need to be addressed before the new rules enter into force in May 2018. Data Protection Authorities need to establish procedures for their new functions and cooperation across the European Union. And also the European legislator is already tasked with new data protection reform projects. In his presentation Andreas will address the upcoming and ongoing challenges of the EU data protection reform form a civil society point of view.

<strong>Max Schrems</strong><p> Activist</p> <font color="#e5e5e5">This is some text! This is some text! </font>

Max Schrems is an Austrian privacy activist who campaigns against for privacy violation, including its violations of European privacy laws and alleged transfer of personal data to the US National Security Agency(NSA) as part of the NSA's programme. He has founded a group called Europe v Facebook and as of February 2015 has initiated two lawsuits involving Facebook.

<strong>Anna Fielder</strong><p> Trustee and Board Chair of the NGO ‘Privacy International’</p>

Anna Fielder has been a consumer and privacy advocate for many years, after having trained as a classics scholar and spending a stint as a travel writer and editor. She is board Chair of Privacy International, the UK charity and NGO defending privacy as a human right; and senior policy advisor to the Transatlantic Consumer Dialogue (TACD), covering all aspects of consumer policy from regulations to digital rights; and she also works as independent policy researcher/advisor for other public interest organisations.

She was previously regional Director at Consumers International, the global consumer federation, where, inter alia, she put issues related to online rights and data protection on the consumer organisations' priority agenda, and set up the TACD back in 1998.

<i>Free Trade Agreements and data processing: what about privacy? </i><font color="#e5e5e5">This is s</font>

Transfers of personal information between countries has become a mainstay of the global economy, and trade has often been a positive driver in encouraging countries to adopt data protection laws, to ensure compliance and ability to conduct business with the EU and other privacy-respecting partners. But given the divergence of privacy and data protection laws between countries – and particularly between the EU’s standards and the US – there is an increasing tendency to include rules for data transfers into free trade agreements. The EU has recently concluded one (with Canada), and negotiating two such trade agreements (TiSA with 23 other countries and TTIP with the US). These agreements could have an impact on EU data protection laws, including possible future “regulatory chill”; how the laws are applied (e.g. adequacy rules or agreements, BCRs, standard clauses etc) could be considered a trade barrier and challenged in trade disputes. Tests that trade dispute bodies apply are different from the tests that, for e.g. the ECJ would apply. There are consequently inherent tensions between those that consider privacy protection as a barrier to trade, stifling innovation and prosperity, and those (and PI is among them) that see it as a fundamental right, that – on the contrary – increases individuals’ trust in commercial engagement and promotes prosperity.  So if language that sets data transfer rules is to be used at all in trade agreements for the various service sectors (financial, e-commerce), it is essential to verify if existing safeguards, mainly in the form of rules set by the WTO, are solid enough to protect our fundamental rights to privacy and data protection. They may well not be, and extra safeguards must be put in place. The presentation will also outline such possible safeguards.

<strong>Moderator: Sarah Spiekermann </strong> <p>Professor for Business Informatics and chair of the Institute for Management Information Systems</p>

Univ.Prof. Dr. Sarah Spiekermann is a professor for Business Informatics since 2009 and chairs the IMIS. Her main areas of expertise are electronic privacy, RFID, personalisation/CRM, attention and interruption management (notification platforms) and context-adaptivity. She has been advising the EU Commission in the area of privacy for RFID since 2005, served as a reviewer of RFID FP7 projects SMART and BRIDGE, co-authored and negotiated the PIA-Framework for RFID (signed in April 2011 by the EU Commission) and developed the PIA guidelines for privacy-friendly RFID systems for the German Federal Institute of Information Security (BSI) (published in November 2011).

 

FRI 30.9.2016 11:00 - 11:45 Coffee Break

 

 

FRI 30.09.2016  11:45-12:30  Legal Perspective

"Legal Privacy Challenges for Corporate Technology"

Room: LC.0.200 

<strong>Paul F. Nemitz</strong><p>Director, Fundamental rights and Union citizenship</p>

Paul F. NEMITZ is the Director for Fundamental rights and Union citizenship in the Directorate-General for Justice and Consumers of the European Commission. The free movement of people in Europe, data protection, fight against  hate speech and racism and rights of the child are key responsibilities of his Directorate. Before joining the Directorate-General for Justice, Nemitz held posts in the Legal Service of the European Commission, the Cabinet of the Commissioner for Development Cooperation and in the Directorates General for Trade, Transport and Maritime Affairs. Nemitz has extensive experience as litigator of the European Commission before the European Court of Justice and has published widely on EU law.

He is visiting Professor at the College of Europe in Bruges. Nemitz studied Law at Hamburg University. He passed the state examinations for the Judiciary and for a short time was a teaching assistant for Constitutional Law and the Law of  the Sea at Hamburg University. He obtained a Master of Comparative Law from George Washington University Law School in Washington, D.C., where he was a Fulbrightgrantee. He also passed the first and second cycle of the Strasburg Faculty for comparative law.

<strong>Dr. Rainer Knyrim</strong><p>Privacy Lawyer, Editor and Author</p>

Rainer Knyrim has studied law at the Universities of Vienna and Paris II. In 1995, he graduated at Karl Franzens University in Graz and served as an intern with the European Commission, GD Competition, in 1997. In 1999, he earned his Doctor Juris at the University of Vienna. After working with Faegre Benson Hobson Audley in London in 2000, he joined Schönherr Attorneys at Law (Vienna) in 2001 as a junior partner.

Since 2003 he is partner at Preslmayr Attorneys at Law focusing on Data Protection and IT-Law. He advises national and international companies in the field of compliance and data protection together with a growing team of specialized lawyers and associates. His work ranges from compliance projects, Data Protection Audits, Data Protection Impact Assessments (DPIAs) and notification procedures with the Austrian Data Protection Agency to support with contracts, agreements, works council agreements, data breach cases etc. and the preparation for the upcoming EU-General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR). Amongst his clients there are major industrial and pharmaceutical companies as well as banks and energy providers.

During the years Rainer has published numerous books and articles and has become one of Austria’s most reknown Data Protection experts. He is a requested interview partner for journalists from print media, radio and TV. Rainer regularly gives speeches on international conferences and on Data Protection seminars and workshops in Austria. Since 2015, he edits the Austrian Data Protection Law review “Datenschutz konkret”. Besides, he is a member of the advisory board of Austrian IT-Law review “jusIT” and of the Austrian IT-Law Convention. Rainer is also a member of the “Privacy Task Force” of the International Chamber of Commerce in Paris. He is certified as an expert for the European Privacy Seal “EuroPriSe” and as CIPM, Certified Information Privacy Manager, from the IAPP in Washington. Currently Rainer prepares a comprehensive handbook on the GDPR (“Datenschutz-Grundverordnung”) assembling more than30 contributions from Austria’s top Data Protection experts, which will appear in June 2016.

<i>From the field: Experiences with the end of Safe Harbor, Privacy Shield and the GDPR</i>

In my daily work as a privacy lawyer, Safe Harbor and Privacy Shield play a major role. How will these instruments be used? What are the legal alternatives and which of them are used in practice? Furthermore, at the rise of the GDPR, companies face a huge workload to get ready for May 2018. Where to start? What to do? And finally: Will the GDPR bring more ethics into the digital world? Or had the privacy directive already done?

<strong>Moderator: Sabrina Kirrane </strong> <p>Assistant professor and director of the Privacy for Sustainable Computing Lab @ WU</p>

Dr. Sabrina Kirrane joined the WU as a postdoctoral researcher in September 2015. Prior to taking up the position at WU she was a researcher at the Insight Centre for Data Analytics, Ireland. Her PhD focused on the problem of access control for the Web of Data. Before that she spent several years working in Industry on topics around data integration and security, such as system security requirements their and implementation in an application service provider environment. Sabrina’s research focuses on the privacy issues that can result from interlinked machine-readable data. Dr. Kirrane is a guest editor for the Journal of Web Semantics special issue on Security, Privacy and Policy for the Semantic Web and Linked Data and besides others organiser of the PrivOn workshop series on Society, Privacy and the Semantic Web - Policy and Technology.

 

FRI 30.9.2016 12:30 – 14:00 Lunch

 

 

FRI 30.09.2016  14:00-15:45  Standardisation Perspective

"Standardisation Efforts to Tackle Privacy & Ethics"

Room: LC.0.200

<strong>Phil Archer</strong><p>Data Activity Lead at W3C</p><font color="#e5e5e5">This is some text! This is some text! This is some text! This is some text! This is some text! This is some text! </font>

Phil Archer is Data Activity Lead at W3C, the industry standards body for the World Wide Web, coordinating W3C's work in the Semantic Web and related technologies. He is most closely involved in the Data on the Web Best Practices, Permissions and Obligations Expression and Spatial Data on the Web Working Groups. His key themes are interoperability through common terminology and URI persistence.

He joined the W3C staff in February 2009 after many years representing one of its member organisations. Chair of the POWDER Working Group, whose standards form part of the Semantic Web technology suite, he was also an original member of the Mobile Web Best Practices Working Group and was editor or acknowledged contributor to 6 of that group's publications.

As well as work at the W3C, his career has encompassed broadcasting, teaching, linked data publishing, copy writing, and, perhaps incongruously, countryside conservation. The common thread throughout has been a knack for communication, particularly communicating complex technical ideas to a more general audience.

<i>We'll read the licence, so you don't have to</i><font color="#e5e5e5">This is some text! This is some text! This is some text! This is some text! </font>

When organisations share and reuse other people's data, there is a clear need for publishers to associate their data with relevant licence terms and for users to respect those terms. Well known licences, such as those offered by Creative Commons, make this easier. However, few people will read those licences before agreeing to the terms and careful reading by people doesn't scale. We need a means to make licences, rights, duties etc. machine readable so that at least some processes can be automated.

This is the motivation for the W3C Permissions and Obligations Expression Working Group. Building on many years of existing work in the ODRL specification, the group is making rapid progress. In this session, W3C's Data Activity Lead, Phil Archer will report on that progress ad set out how it fits into the broader spectrum of Web standards.

<strong>Prof. Dr. Kai Rannenberg</strong> <p>Deutsche Telekom Chair of Mobile Business & Multilateral Security @ Goethe University Frankfurt</p><p> </p>

Kai Rannenberg holds the Deutsche Telekom Chair (formerly T-Mobile Chair) of Mobile Business & Multilateral Security since 2002. Before he was with the System Security Group at Microsoft Research Cambridge, UK focussing on „Personal Security Devices & Privacy Technologies“.

1993-1999 Kai worked at Freiburg University and coordinated the interdisciplinary “Kolleg Security in Communication Technology”, sponsored by Gottlieb Daimler & Karl Benz Foundation researching Multilateral Security. After a Diploma in Informatics at TU Berlin he had focused his PhD at Freiburg University on IT Security Evaluation Criteria and their potential and limits regarding the protection of users and subscribers. Since 1991 Kai is active in the ISO/IEC standardization of IT Security and Criteria (JTC 1/SC 27/WG 3 “Security evaluation criteria”).

Since March 2007 he is Convenor of the SC 27/WG 5 “Identity management and privacy technologies”. Since October 2015 Kai is an IFIP Vice President, before he was an IFIP Councillor since 2009. From May 2007 till July 2013 he chaired IFIP TC-11 “Security and Privacy Protection in Information Processing Systems”, after having been its Vice-Chair since 2001. Kai is active in the Council of European Professional Informatics Societies (CEPIS) chairing its Legal & Security Issues Special Interest Network (CEPIS LSI) since 2003.

From July 2004 till June 2013 Kai served as the academic expert in the Management Board of the European Network and Information Security Agency, ENISA and is now a member of ENISA's Permanent Stakeholder Group .

Kai's awards include the IFIP Silver Core, the Alcatel SEL Foundation Dissertation Award and the Friedrich-August-von- Hayek-Preis of Freiburg University and Deutsche Bank.

<i>ISO/IEC Standardisation for identity management and privacy in ISO/IEC JTC 1/SC 27/WG 5</i><font color="#e5e5e5"> This is some text! This is some text!</font>

In 2006 ISO/IEC JTC 1/SC 27 “IT Security techniques” established Working Group 5 “Identity management and privacy technologies”. Meanwhile WG 5 completed 10 projects, among them the landmark standards ISO/IEC 29100 Privacy framework, ISO/IEC 27018 Code of practice for protection of personally identifiable information (PII) in public clouds acting as PII processors, and ISO/IEC 24760 A framework for identity management. This presentation describes the work of WG 5 including an overview of current projects and plans for further development.

<strong>Robin Wilton</strong> <p>Technical Outreach for Identity & Privacy @ ISOC (Internet Society)</p><font color="#e5e5e5">This is some text! This is some text! This is some text! This is some text! </font>

Robin Wilton is the Technical Outreach Director for Identity and Privacy, in the Internet Society’s Internet Technology Office. He is a specialist in digital identity, IT security and public policy, with over 30 years’ experience in systems engineering, consulting and industry analyst roles. He joined the Internet Society in 2012, and is also a member of the Kantara Initiative’s Board of Trustees. Robin is one of ISOC’s representatives in policy forums such as the Council of Europe and OECD, and technology forums such as the IETF. 

Currently, his two principal privacy themes are:

- Understanding the effect of current technical developments on user agency;

- Developing practical guidance on how to treat personal data ethically.

Robin has a reputation for ‘translating’ complex topics between technologists, business-people and policy-makers. His long-term interest is in how social constructs such as identity, privacy and trust are mediated through technology. www.internetsociety.org/footprint

<i>A Framework for Practical Guidance on Ethical Data-handling</i><font color="#e5e5e5"> This is some text! This is some text! This is some </font>

Like many Internet issues, Ethical Data Handling (EDH) presents a set of multi-stakeholder problems, with conflicting interests among the various stakeholders.

Different parties are also at different stages of awareness about the problem, and face different obstacles on the road to a more ethical set-up. I will present the Internet Society’s proposed framework for assembling practical guidance on ethical data-handling issues, looking at all phases of the problem, from problem definition and awareness-raising, through design and development, to adoption and optimisation of the resulting systems. I will also describe some of the core communities who have contributed to this work over the past year, and how we plan to engage with other potential partners (including those present in Vienna!).

<strong>Konstantinos Karachalios,Ph.D</strong> <p> Managing Director IEEE-Standards association and Member of the Management Council of IEEE</p>

Dr. Ing. Konstantinos Karachalios a globally recognised leader in standards development and intellectual property, managing director of the IEEE Standards Association and a member of the IEEE Management Council.

As managing director, he has been enhancing IEEE efforts in global standards development in strategic emerging technology fields, through technical excellence of staff, expansion of global presence and activities and emphasis on inclusiveness and good governance, including reform of the IEEE standards-related patent policy.

As member of the IEEE Management Council, he championed expansion of IEEE influence in key techno-political areas, including consideration of social and ethical implications of technology, according to the IEEE mission to advance technology for humanity. Results have been rapid in coming and profound; IEEE is becoming the place to go for debating and building consensus on issues such as Internet governance and ethics in design of autonomous systems.

Before IEEE, Konstantinos played a crucial role in successful French-German cooperation in coordinated research and scenario simulation for large-scale nuclear reactor accidents. And with the European Patent Office, his experience included establishing EPO’s patent academy, the department for delivering technical assistance for developing countries and the public policy department, serving as an envoy to multiple U.N. organisations.

Konstantinos earned a Ph.D. in energy engineering (nuclear reactor safety) and masters in mechanical engineering from the University of Stuttgart.

<i>Technology for Humanity</i><font color="#e5e5e5"> This is some text! This is some text! This is some text! This is some text! This is some text!</font>

IEEE is the largest engineering association in the world with almost 440,000 members in over 190 countries. Working within its mission to advance technology for humanity, IEEE is keenly aware that advancing technology in the digital and algorithmic economy demands cultural and societal sensitivity as well interaction with policy at the global and local levels. IEEE is redefining innovation by encouraging development and use of technologies informed by ethical methodologies and by prioritising human wellbeing in the algorithmic age.

For this reason, IEEE is connecting engineers, scientists, industry leaders, and others engaged in an array of technology and industry domains globally with policy experts to help improve the state of knowledge about technology and its implications and impact on society.

Launched in 2014, the IEEE Internet Initiative supports an open, transparent, and inclusive Internet governance policy process that can restore trust for ICT technologies within the existing and evolving Internet and the ever-growing IOT landscape. The Initiative provides a collaborative platform for advancing solutions and informing global technology policymaking through a consensus of sound technical and scientific knowledge and guidance in the areas of Internet governance, cybersecurity, and privacy.

At a parallel and interrelated front IEEE is focusing on technology ethics, and has established two groups to address issues surrounding autonomous systems and Artificial Intelligence. The Ethics, Society & Technology (EST) Program is driven to create conversations that can broaden the thinking and open up possibilities for solutions around these issues, and The Global Initiative for Ethical Considerations in the Design of Autonomous Systems is creating consensus processes leading to standards and codes that can be applied in the marketplace and promote technological advancement while addressing societal concerns.

<strong>Moderator: Axel Polleres</strong> <p>Professor for Business Informatics and chair of the Institute for Business Information Systems</p>

Univ.-Prof. Dr. Axel Polleres joined the WU in September 2013. Before he worked at TU Vienna, Univ. Innsbruck, Univ. Rey Juan Carlos (Madrid, Spain), the Digital Enterprise Research Institute (DERI) at NUI Galway (Ireland), and for Siemens AG. His research focuses on ontologies, query and rules languages, Semantic Web technologies (particularly scalable semantic data management), Web services, knowledge management, Linked Open Data, configuration technologies and their applications. Axel has published more than 100 scientific articles and actively contributed to international standardisation efforts within the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) where he co-chaired the W3C SPARQL working group.

 

FRI 30.9.2016 15:45-16:15 Coffee Break

 

 

FRI 30.09.2016  16:15-18:00  Technical Perspective

"Technical Challenges to meet Privacy Requirements"

Room: LC.0.200

<strong>Prof. Dr. Piero Bonatti</strong><p>Professor for Computer Science at the University of Naples</p>

Piero A. Bonatti is full professor of computer science at the University of Napoli Federico II, where he is chairing the Computer Science curricula. His current research interests include models and mechanisms for computer security and privacy. Within these areas, he has recently focussed on inference-proof semantic data publishing, and economically-inspired mechanisms for incentivating privacy-preserving data acquisition and processing on the web.

<i>Supporting and guiding the creation of better policies</i>

It will be presented and discussed:  (i) automated policy synthesis and why it is needed in big data, and (ii) the need for a transparency infrastructure to connect users with data processors. How the information carried by the infrastructure might help users to improve their privacy preferences (eg. by extending machine learning approaches a-la Sadeh to a wider context), and how suitable regulations might exploit the infrastructure to prosecute illegal information disclosures (along the lines of the inspection games outlined  in the 2013 Data Usage workshop paper).  So better policies would arise from a combination of automated synthesis, transparency, and incentives, that collectively influence the behavior of all involved parties. 

<strong>Prof. Dr. A Min Tjoa</strong><p>Director of the Institute for Software Technology @ TU Vienna</p>

Professor Dr. A Min Tjoa has been a full professor and director of the Institute of Software Technology and Interactive Systems at the Vienna University of Technology since 1994. He is the chairman of the Austrian National Competence Center for Security Research (Competence Centers for Excellent Technologies Initiative of the Austrian government). He was visiting professor at the Universities of Zurich, Kyushu and Wroclaw (Poland) and at the Technical Universities of Prague and Lausanne (Switzerland). From 1999 to 2003, he was the president of the Austrian Computer Society. He is vice-chairman of the IFIP Technical Committee for Information Systems and chairman of the IFIP Working Group on Enterprise Information Systems.

Member of the Board (Senate) of the Christian Doppler Foundation for the establishment of high-technology transfer labs in Austria. He is also the University of Technology's Coordinator of the ASEA-UNINET (ASEAN-EU University Network) and Vice-Chairman of the DEXA Association (Database and Expert System Applications). He has served as chairman of several international conferences including the IEEE Int. Conf. on Distributed Computing Systems(ICDCS), European Software Engineering Conference (ESEC), ACM SIGSOFT Symposium on the Foundations of Software Engineering (FSE), the International Conference on Database and Expert Systems Applications (DEXA), the International Conference on Electronic Commerce and Web Technologies (EC-Web). He was Honorary Chairman of the International Conference on Very Large Databases (VLDB 2007).

In 2011 he received the honorary doctoral degree (Dr.h.c.) from the Czech Technical University in Prague and the honorary professor degree of the University of Hue (Vietnam). He is currently member of the Council of Doctoral Studies in Mathematics, Informatics and Telecommunication (Conseil de l' Ecole Doctorate Mathématique, Informatique et Telecommunications de Toulouse) which covers all universities in the Toulouse area. His current research focus areas are data warehousing, cloud computing, semantic web, security, and non-standard IT-applications. He has published more than 200 peer reviewed articles in journals and conferences.

<strong>Rigo Wenning</strong><p>W3C Legal counsel ERCIM Legal counsel Rechtsanwalt</p>

Rigo Wenning after a research position at the Institut für Rechtsinformatik in Saarbrücken joined W3C's french host (ERCIM) in 1999 to work on Privacy. He became W3C's legal counsel in 2005 and extended his footprint with research in the area of privacy, security and rights management, also for ERCIM. Rigo is also an attorney with firm Alavi, Frösner, Stadler in Freising/Bavaria.

<i>Constraint Management and Data Handling in Big Data</i>

Privacy and Big Data is one of the most discussed topics nowadays. Politicians and lawmakers are desperately looking for a solution. Many claim there is none, but science has found a way. But Big Data has further issues, especially ownership and exploitation rights. Privacy and other rights have in common that they are constraints to the exploitation of the data. Rigo Wenning will shed a light on this.

<strong>Prof. Dr. Stefan Decker</strong><p>Director Fraunhofer FIT, Professor at RWTH Aachen University</p>

Prof Stefan Decker is a professor at RWTH Aachen University and the director of the Fraunhofer Institute for Applied Information Technology in Germany. Previously he held positions at the National
University of Ireland and as the director of the Digital Enterprise Research Institute (DERI) in Galway, Ireland,  the Information Sciences Institute of the University of Southern California, USA, Stanford University and the University of Karlsruhe (now KIT). He is working on Linked Data and Semantic Web technology since 1998. His current research interest includes Prototypes for Knowledge Representation and Knowledge Pipelines as well as applications for Linked Data Technologies in the life sciences and humanities.
More information about publications about Stefan can be found at
http://www.stefandecker.org/ and
https://scholar.google.com/citations?user=uhVkSswAAAAJ&hl=en

 

 

<i>Torwards the privacy singularity</i><font color="#e5e5e5"></font>

Data is becoming ever more accessible and easier to integrate. It is no longer only a question of our own digital footprint we leave behind, but also about the footprint that others leave behind about us.

So it is no longer a question how transparent we have become - it's only a question who has access to it.

The state of complete transparency I call "privacy singularity", and I will argue that we as a society are at a choice point.

I will describe the choice point and my own views on what the consequences for each of these choices are.

 

<strong>Moderator: Prof. Dr. Kai Rannenberg</strong> <p>Deutsche Telekom Chair of Mobile Business & Multilateral Security @ Goethe University Frankfurt</p>

Kai Rannenberg holds the Deutsche Telekom Chair (formerly T-Mobile Chair) of Mobile Business & Multilateral Security since 2002. Before he was with the System Security Group at Microsoft Research Cambridge, UK focussing on „Personal Security Devices & Privacy Technologies“.

1993-1999 Kai worked at Freiburg University and coordinated the interdisciplinary “Kolleg Security in Communication Technology”, sponsored by Gottlieb Daimler & Karl Benz Foundation researching Multilateral Security. After a Diploma in Informatics at TU Berlin he had focused his PhD at Freiburg University on IT Security Evaluation Criteria and their potential and limits regarding the protection of users and subscribers. Since 1991 Kai is active in the ISO/IEC standardization of IT Security and Criteria (JTC 1/SC 27/WG 3 “Security evaluation criteria”).

Since March 2007 he is Convenor of the SC 27/WG 5 “Identity management and privacy technologies”. Since October 2015 Kai is an IFIP Vice President, before he was an IFIP Councillor since 2009. From May 2007 till July 2013 he chaired IFIP TC-11 “Security and Privacy Protection in Information Processing Systems”, after having been its Vice-Chair since 2001. Kai is active in the Council of European Professional Informatics Societies (CEPIS) chairing its Legal & Security Issues Special Interest Network (CEPIS LSI) since 2003.

From July 2004 till June 2013 Kai served as the academic expert in the Management Board of the European Network and Information Security Agency, ENISA and is now a member of ENISA's Permanent Stakeholder Group .

Kai's awards include the IFIP Silver Core, the Alcatel SEL Foundation Dissertation Award and the Friedrich-August-von- Hayek-Preis of Freiburg University and Deutsche Bank.

 

Travel Information

 

LOCATION

Wirtschaftsuniversität Wien, WU

Vienna University of Economics and Business

Welthandelsplatz 1, 1020 Vienna, Austria

Contact: Privacy Lab

ARRIVAL BY AIRPLANE

If you are traveling to Vienna by plane, you will arrive either at Vienna International Airport in Schwechat, or in Bratislava. To get from Vienna International Airport, located outside the city limits, to the city center, you can take the City Airport Train (CAT), the Airport Express bus, the Schnellbahn (S-Bahn), the Vienna Airport Service or a taxi.

By City Airport train: The City Airport Train leaves every half hour from the city center (subway station “Landstraße/ Wien-Mitte”) and the airport. The trip takes 16 minutes. City Airport Train (CAT)

By Airport Express Busses: Airport Express Busses from the Vienna Airport Lines connect the city center and Vienna International Airport via four lines: › Vienna International Airport – Morzinplatz/Schwedenplatz › Vienna International Airport – Wien Meidling – Wien Westbahnhof › Vienna International Airport – Kaisermühlen VIC – Kagran › Vienna International Airport – Mödling – Baden For further information about timetables and fares, please go to the web page of Vienna AirportLines: Vienna Airportlines

By “S 7” Schnellbahn (S-Bahn): Please make sure to board the train towards “Wolfsthal” or “Flughafen” when going to the airport. From the airport, take the train towards “Wien Mitte”, “Wien Nord” or “Floridsdorf”.

Bratislava Airport is located 65km from the center of Vienna. A bus from Südtiroler Platz (the U1 subway line stops there) will take you to Bratislava Airport in approximately 90 minutes.

ARRIVAL BY TRAIN

All of Vienna’s train stations are connected to the public transport system. The WU Vienna is located at Krieau (U2). For further information, please go to: Wienerlinien

HOTELS IN VIENNA

Hotels near to the Vienna University of Economics and Business (WU):

Motel One Vienna Prater

Ausstellungsstraße 40, 1020 Vienna, Austria/  Tel: +43(1)729 7800/ wien-prater@motel-one.com

Austria Trend Hotel Messe Wien

Messestraße 2, 1020 Vienna, Austria/ Tel: +43 (1) 727 270/ reservierung.messe@austria-trend.at

Courtyard Vienna Prater/Messe

Trabrennstrasse 4, 1020 Vienna, Austria/   Tel: +43(1)727 30/ reservation@cy-wien-messe.at

Austria Classic Hotel Wien

Praterstr. 72, 1020 Vienna, Austria /Tel. +43 (1) 211 300/ info@classic-hotelwien.at

Fleming's Deluxe Hotel Wien-City

Josefstädter Straße 10-12, 1080 Vienna, Austria / Tel +43 (1) 205 990/ wien-city@flemings-hotels.com

Fleming's Hotel Wien-Westbahnhof

Neubaugürtel 26-28, 1070 Vienna, Austria/ +43 (1) 205 990/ wien@flemings-hotels.com

Hotel Regina

Rooseveltplatz 15, 1090 Vienna, Austria/ Tel. +43 (1) 404 46-0/ regina@kremslehnerhotels.at


Alternatively, there are several popular web platforms that give a good overview of hotels in Vienna and let you book rooms online. Please book soon as there are many events in Vienna during this time of the year!